2011 Medieval Festival at Ft. Tryon Park

This past Sunday I had the pleasure of dancing at the 27th Annual Medieval Festival at Ft. Tryon park, home of the Cloisters Museum. Not only was it an absolutely beautiful fall day with an enthusiastic audience, but the stage I danced on had replicas of some of the museum’s tapestries on it! One of my favorite parts of this event was teaching the audience afterwards, especially my new troupe of lil knights’n’ladies.

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Can a costume make–or break–a performance?

There are many reasons that we choose to wear a certain costume for a performance. Maybe its color matches the theme of the event, your audience expects a certain kind of costume, your dance style requires it, or it just makes you feel good that day. But can your choice of a costume make–or break–your performance?

I started thinking about that this Sunday evening after hearing these five words: “You should have worn that.” They came from my boyfriend, who having seen more of my performances than anyone else, is a very keen observer and purveyor of dance advice. He had just watched the video for a performance where I wore a tribaret style costume with multi-panel skirt and short coined fringe on the bra and belt. He commented on the way that the costumed moved and flowed with my movements, and accented them so that you could see every shimmy despite the performance being on a large stage. He’d seen the same choreography performed a few weeks earlier at an important event, but in a couture-style slim Egyptian lycra costume, which, while heavily beaded, is anything but swishy.

While he noted that I’d performed with essentially the same amount of energy and finesse as at the previous show, the performance in the tribaret costume seemed much more alive and dynamic simply because the costume complimented and amplified my movements. Now I’m wondering, did my minimalist, slimline costume “break” my last performance? This has gotten me really curious, and now I’m ready to take a critical eye to my costume¬†wardrobe.

Which costume (or costume styles) “make” your performances?