Registration open for Belly Dance with Veil at the Princeton Adult School (Princeton, NJ)

It’s time to get hip in Princeton again! Join me this fall for a three-week session that will introduce you to the beautiful world of belly dance with veil.

Register at the Princeton Adult School’s website

Najla Belly Dance NYC with veil

Class description:

Tuesdays, October 2, 9 & 16, 6-7:30 pm (**the PAS website says 7 pm end time, but this is a typo!)
Community Park School, 372 Witherspoon, Princeton, NJ

Veils are large pieces of lightweight fabric (usually silk) used by belly dancers to create flowing, atmospheric dances. The veil dance may be a distant cousin of North African and Middle Eastern shawl, skirt and handkerchief dances, but veil dancing as we know it today has its origins in theatrical performances from the 1940s by Egyptian dancers. This course will introduce dancers to basic veil holds, turns, and combinations using a single veil, and will integrate veil performance with the fundamental movements of Egyptian dance. Some belly dance experience required. Participants must bring their own 3.5-4 yard veil, preferably silk.

(also available for purchase on the instructor’s online shop.)

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Belly Dance “Prop-tacular” at Figment – Veil

Thanks for coming to Belly Dance “Prop-tacular” at the 2011 FIGMENT festival in NYC!

Veil

Najla Belly Dance NYC Rakkasah East Veil

Najla dances with a veil at Rakkasah East. Photograph by Carl Sermon Photography.

Veils are large pieces of lightweight fabric (usually silk) that are used by belly dancers to create flowing, atmospheric dances. Veils come in a variety of shapes and sizes, including rectangular and half circle, and can be used singularly or in pairs (or sometimes more!). The veil dance may be a distant cousin of North African and Middle Eastern shawl, skirt and handkerchief dances, but veil dancing as we know it today has its origins in theatrical performances from the 1940s by Egyptian dancers like Samia Gamal and fantasy “historical” performances by Ruth St. Denis and others. While veils were originally used to make grand entrances and the dropped soon after, veilwork has evolved to become the focus of entire dances.

For more information on Najla’s performances and classes, visit her website.

For more information on FIGMENT, visit their website.

Belly Dance Prop-tacular at FIGMENT NYC 2011 - Najla Belly Dance NYC - Logo(For those of you who aren’t coming to this page from the festival, this blog entry is part of a series of posts on the different belly dance props being showcased during Najla’s festival performances at the Colonels Stage on Governors Island at 1:30 pm on June 10 and at 12:00 pm on June 12, 2011. Audience members will be able to scan a QR code next to a picture of each prop in order to learn more about it.  )